#Top10Tuesday Top Ten Questions To Ask Yourself When You Clean Up Your Nano Project

Nanowrimo is almost done!!

And if you are one of those gold star, overachieving type, you may be wondering what to do with this little project once it’s all over. (This blog will have plenty of advice in December!)

Top Ten Questions To Ask Yourself When You Clean Up Your Nano Project
Top Ten Questions To Ask Yourself When You Clean Up Your Nano Project

But for now, let’s list a few general tips to consider when fine tune that draft. These all have to do with the general story structure and plot –these are big issues. In fact, you can’t do much more with the development of your story until these wrinkles are ironed out. Are you ready to answer some tough questions? (And have a stronger manuscript as a result?) Let’s Go!

1. Does the point of view character you chose have the most to lose?

2. Is your point of view consistent throughout the story?

Did you choose the right person's point of view?
Did you choose the right person’s point of view?

3. About the first third of the way in, does the main character set off on some sort of task or adventure?

4. Does the main character have a precise outward goal?

What do I do when I'm stuck on a story idea?
from Frabz.com

5. Does the main character have a inner basic drive, such as acceptance or justice or vengeance or security?

6. Are the obstacles in the path of the main character increasingly more dramatic?

7. Is there a point about 3/4 of the way in the story in which all seems hopelessly lost for your main character?

8. Does your main character have two mutually exclusive desires? Is there critical point in the story, about 3/4 of the way through in which he will have to choose one over the loss of the other?

What is that Phillip Pullman quote about stories?
Share this quote with your friends! Please pin!

9. Is your character’s choice a predictable one? If it is, you’ll need to rewrite it to surprise your reader?

10. Does the last fourth of your story tie up all the loose ends and put your main character into a permanent new situation?

Congratulations! You got those 50,000 words in, but you’re not done yet! Don’t be intimidated by the work that still needs to be done.  Your book is worth it!

About Katharine Grubb

Katharine Grubb has mastered the art of freewriting because she wrote her first novel in 10 minute increments. There are probably easier ways to write a book, but with homeschooling her five children, she’ll take what she can get. Her latest book, Write A Novel In 10 Minutes A Day was just released and is available on Amazon.com She lives in Massachusetts and blogs at www.10minutenovelists.com.

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