• Craft,  Reading

    The Diary of A Beta Reader: A Guest Post by Sara Marschand

    Guest blogger Sara Marschand explains her thought processes while she beta reads. A beta reader is often the first or second set of eyes a manuscript gets. Their purpose is to spot holes in a manuscript and communicate to a writer, who maybe a little myopic, that changes need to be made.  For the last several years, I’ve had the privilege of beta reading for many authors. Much of my feedback highlights awkward sentence flags and unclear story parts. Sometimes it’s a setting that can’t be visualized, other times it may be a whole scene that doesn’t fit the narrative. Logical errors are the easiest to spot. One author described…

  • Beautiful Words,  Craft

    Top 10 Questions To Ask Others and Avoid Being Labeled Another Emily Dickinson by Katharine Grubb, 10 Minute Novelists

    If you are a writer, then it is likely that you prefer to be isolated from the rest of the world. You spend your days thinking up great stories, making them as perfect as you possibly can. You may create that ideal lover, that ideal setting or that ideal story that you believe is the only story worth telling, at least for now. You may often be so engrossed in the creation of your little world that you forget that when the story is over, you may have to share it. And that thought makes you want to pretend you’re Emily Dickinson. Emily Dickinson was an American poet who lived…

  • #Top10Tuesday,  Craft,  Work-In-Progress

    #Top10Tuesday Top Ten Questions To Ask Your Beta Readers

    Beta readers are the best! They are an author’s second readers. I’m guessing, and don’t hold me to it, that the alpha reader is the author himself. God knows YOU’VE read your book enough, right? Good writers use beta readers’ opinions to iron out the story’s wrinkles, find out what’s missing and see what the writer doesn’t see. You can use beta readers early in your writing journey, say, after the first draft. Or you can wait several drafts into it and then let trusted people read it.  Either way, you may find it helpful to give them specific questions to answer about your manuscript. Today’s Top 10 Tuesday is this! #Top10Tuesday…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Craft,  Work-In-Progress

    Eleven Ways To Know The Best Time To Show Your Work (And When You Should You Hold It Close To Your Chest)

    Oh, we writers are an insecure bunch aren’t we? When we start out, we’re hesitant and flighty, nervous and fretful. We crave affirmation that we’re on the right track, but we stop so often to ask, we make little progress. Then it doesn’t help that there are so many book/websites/blogs to read about how to be a great writer that it just makes us more insecure in who we are. So are we good or not? How do we know? When do we find out? Why isn’t there a rule about this? Um, well, this is the problem with the subjectivity in good writing. No one really knows. But that doesn’t…