• #Top10Tuesday,  Craft

    Top Ten Resources For Classical Story Structure by Katharine Grubb, 10 Minute Novelist

    Do you have a new story idea and don’t know what to do with it? It is very possible to want to write a story, have a story idea, and plan on knocking out 50,000 words in 30 days without really knowing the important necessities of a story. Sure, in Western Culture we’ve heard countless stories, we have a general idea of beginning, middle and end.  We know that you need characters and setting and some sort of plot despite the title of this book. But to write a story you really need to get a handle on what’s needed in a GOOD ONE before you try crafting one. What Do I…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Craft,  Creativity,  Nanowrimo

    Top Ten Nanowrimo Emergency Prompts For The Overwhelmed

      Are you stuck yet? Don’t worry, you will be. When you are, don’t panic!  Don’t worry!  You’ll get through it! If you get stuck, here are ten writing prompts that might send you off on a tangent, help you finish your book! 1. Put your character in an actual emergency. Food allergies, car accident, flash flood, explosive plumbing, gas leak — none of these are planned. You don’t have to plan yours too. And even if it looks rather deux et machina -ish, don’t worry about it. You can always go back and fix it later.   2. What does your character have in his pocket, purse or glove compartment? Candy? A gun? Drugs?…

  • Craft

    Fall in Love with Your Characters (So The Reader Will Too) — A Guest Post By Jessica White

    One of my favorite parts of writing is creating characters.  As a reader nothing makes me fall into a story faster than falling in love with a character.  It’s like meeting a new neighbor or making a new friend.  Even the antagonists are interesting to meet from the safety of my mind.   I love watching them grow in depth and complexity, learning their quirks, hobbies, backstories, and what makes them tick.  You can tell the exact same plot line from a million points of view, and each time it will be a different story, because each character will make different decisions. For many writers a character begins a bit…

  • #Top10Tuesday,  Nanowrimo,  Revising and Editing,  Work-In-Progress

    #Top10Tuesday Top Ten Questions To Ask Yourself When You Clean Up Your Nano Project

    Nanowrimo is almost done!! And if you are one of those gold star, overachieving type, you may be wondering what to do with this little project once it’s all over. (This blog will have plenty of advice in December!) But for now, let’s list a few general tips to consider when fine tune that draft. These all have to do with the general story structure and plot –these are big issues. In fact, you can’t do much more with the development of your story until these wrinkles are ironed out. Are you ready to answer some tough questions? (And have a stronger manuscript as a result?) Let’s Go! 1. Does…

  • Craft,  Creativity,  Work-In-Progress

    How To Describe An Object And Why It Matters In Your Novel

    It’s pity that I don’t hold murder weapons on my desk. If I did, I could describe them and stick them in my work-in-progress. This is what I do have: I have a cobalt glass heart that I use as a paperweight. My husband’s cousin, Robin gave it to me. It’s been over 15 years since she’s given it to me and I can’t not think of her when I see it. This glass heart could be a weapon if I needed to be. It has little value other than who gave it to me. I also have a lamp, a cardboard coaster from a beer garden in Germany, four…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Craft,  Work-In-Progress

    Eleven Ways To Know The Best Time To Show Your Work (And When You Should You Hold It Close To Your Chest)

    Oh, we writers are an insecure bunch aren’t we? When we start out, we’re hesitant and flighty, nervous and fretful. We crave affirmation that we’re on the right track, but we stop so often to ask, we make little progress. Then it doesn’t help that there are so many book/websites/blogs to read about how to be a great writer that it just makes us more insecure in who we are. So are we good or not? How do we know? When do we find out? Why isn’t there a rule about this? Um, well, this is the problem with the subjectivity in good writing. No one really knows. But that doesn’t…