• #MondayBlogs,  Publishing

    Top 10 Things To Consider When Choosing A Publisher With The Same Care As A Jane Austen Heroine Chose A Husband

      It is a truth universally acknowledged that a writer in possession of a good story must be in want of a publisher. It’s the age old story. You have so many hopes and dreams. You have all these wonderful stories to tell. You know that it will take an attachment, a proposal and perhaps a big commitment to make you moderately rich and a teensy bit famous. So you, the perfect Lizzie Bennet, who will only writes for love, not necessarily £10,000 a year, will be happy just to attach yourself with a publisher who respects you. Fortunately for you, your access to publishers on the internet is an…

  • Craft

    More Questions To Ask After That First Draft Is Done

    Your first draft is done! And trust me when I say this, it is not ready to be published!  How do you know this? No one writes a perfect first draft. You don’t either. Before you let your mom, your best buddy or the pizza guy read this draft, make sure it’s the best you can make it. Here are questions you can ask about this draft. Go on! Take your time to think about it! Make notes!  Each change you make will probably be for the better. And if you are serious about getting this published, then you’ll be far more marketable and competitive in this saturated markets. Your pizza…

  • Craft

    How The “There Are No Rules” Rule Can Set You Up For Failure & Mockery

    I’m not sure who started the “there are no rules in writing” rule. It certainly wasn’t an English teacher. There ARE rules. Rules for grammar, spelling, and punctuation bring order and dignity to our language. There are also rules for storytelling, rules for submissions, rules of common sense, rules of general communication that YOU MUST follow if you want to be taken seriously.  If you are a writer then your job is to communicate to your reader. If you are deliberately being sloppy, apathetic or lazy then the message you’re sending to your reader is “I’m above the rules” or “You’re too stupid” or “Conventions aren’t for geniuses like me.”…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Nanowrimo,  Work-In-Progress

    Top 10 Ways You May Be Doing National Novel Writing Month All Wrong

    by Katharine Grubb, 10 Minute Novelist Is it really November? Is it really time to start that non-stop frenzy that requires 50,000 words in 30 days? It is! Congratulations to all of you who are attempting it this year! And to those of you who have tried, get discouraged and possibly think you are on the road to failure, just consider this:  you may be doing it wrong.  1. You think every word you write is golden. Um, your nano project is a first draft. Please, for the love of all that’s publishable, type this sentence ten times —> MY NANO PROJECT IS A FIRST DRAFT. The solution? Just plan…

  • #EthicalAuthor,  Discipline,  Self-Publishing

    Top 10 Questions To Ask Yourself About Your Author Ethics (With Taylor Swift & Zombie References!)

    Writers today have dreams of instant success and fame! And because the idea of easy publishing is so tempting, we rush into it with  no idea what we should do to promote ourselves. Often our goal is just to gain any advantage we can in an increasingly competitive market. We may feel “creativity” in marketing trumps courteous behavior. We may suggest trading reviews with another author, not realizing this behavior could weaken our credibility. We may be so distracted by the elusive promise of financial success that we neglect to nurture our art. Or we may attach our pursuit of fame so tightly to our own identities that we can’t…

  • #EthicalAuthor,  Marketing,  Publishing

    Top 10 Reasons Why Reciprocal Reviews Are Unethical

    by Katharine Grubb, 10 Minute Novelist This has the potential of being my most controversial post yet. And I like controversy about as much as I like snooty  moms asking me personal questions about the decisions I made in the raising of my children. But I believe that reciprocal reviews for authors are unethical, unprofessional and unnecessary.  Unfortunately, the idea of “you review my book and I’ll review yours” is a common one among writers, especially self-published writers who are just starting out. The necessity of good reviews and the belief that reviews alone will generate sales is a faulty one. So this behavior of reciprocating favorable reviews can nudge an…

  • Social Media,  Twitter

    Top 10 Things Writers Do Wrong On Twitter

    by Katharine Grubb, 10 Minute Novelists  You’ve written a book! You’ve followed all the great advice! You’ve got your Facebook page and your blog set up and your Twitter account is up and running! You’re doing everything right, or at least you think you are.  The Facebook likes are trickling in, you get a few hits on your blog and then there’s Twitter. You have few followers. You have few RTs. You aren’t making a lot of sales. No one has seen your awesomeness.  Ever thought about why? You COULD be making some serious mistakes that are pushing people away.  I know, it’s hard to believe, especially since it seems…

  • Discipline,  Inspiration,  Motivation,  Self Talk

    10 Destructive, Cowardly Lies I Had To Discard So I Could Become A Writer

    This is one of my favorite blog posts. I’m bringing it back from 2014 because I think we could all use a fresh reminder!  We don’t get in this business to be comfortable. We get in this business because the drive to create is bigger than the drive to be accepted. It takes guts and courage to throw your words to the world. And if lies are keeping you back, then you need to put them in the toilet with the rest of the ca-ca in your life.  I’ve overcome a lot of lies to get where I am today. That alone makes me a success. Not sales, not followers…

  • Self Talk

    What To Do With Too Much Writing Advice (And How Not To Let it Drive You To Drink)

      I think I understand why old school writers were heavy drinkers. I think I understand why some of them fell into dark thoughts, depression or loneliness. I think I understand why writers generally are isolated introverts, hiding from the real world, wrapping themselves up in their imaginary lands, fighting dragons, discovering treasure and falling in love: They’re hiding from ubiquitous and contradictory writing advice.  Single point of view or not? Past tense or not?  Predictable, relatable characters or something unique? Write what you know or write what you don’t know? Publish it immediately to get it out there or rewrite it a million times? And that’s just the craft…

  • #IndependentPublishing,  Publishing,  Self-Publishing

    Learning From The Independent Publishing Experience: A Guest Post By Jude Knight

    What have you learned from this experience? The headline is a quote from the man I adore: “What have you learned from this experience?” (Not, incidentally, what you want to hear when you’ve just bumped your toe or broken your heart. But I love you, darling.) Six months ago last month, I published my first historical romance, a novella. I’ve since published a novel, am about to publish another one, and will have another novel and a novella out by my 1st anniversary as an independent publisher. I still have a great deal to learn, but here are my top five lessons from this first venture into the wild and…

  • #MagicalMarketing,  #MondayBlogs,  #SellingMySoul,  Marketing,  Social Media

    Nine Things I’ve Learned About Book Marketing That I Didn’t Know Last Year

    I am not a marketing expert.  I am, however, an informed consumer and reluctant buyer of stuff. I am not easily impressed. I don’t follow trends, I am only impressed with designer labels when I see them at my local thrift store. I also come from a family of manipulators so if anyone has a BS detector, I do. You would think that I would have negative feelings about marketing. You’d be wrong. I LOVE IT! I love it because it’s not what I thought it was. I thought that if I am going to sell, then I have to be annoying to buyers. If I’m going to sell, then…

  • Discipline

    Breaking Up With Writers’ Block

      It’s time for me to break up with Writer’s Block. If Writer’s Block was a person, he would be five feet eight. He is in his 40s but he looks much older. He has a greasy blond comb over on his freckled bald head. His face is sallow. His jowls are flabby and droopy. He admittedly never looks in a mirror. He has stray gray hairs that come out of his chin. I don’t know why there isn’t more evidence of a beard. Maybe that’s the most dramatic his beard gets. He has a dull stud in one ear, which has hairs and wax coming out of them. He’s wearing…

  • #EthicalAuthor,  Discipline,  Marketing

    #Top10Tuesday Top 10 Things That Are Wrong With Reciprocal Reviews

      This has the potential of being my most controversial post yet. And I like controversy about as much as I like snooty  moms asking me personal questions about the decisions I made in the raising of my children. But  I believe that reciprocal reviews have the potential of being unethical simply because any quid pro quo arrangement could be intentionally tainted, possibly inaccurate and maybe even dishonest. My friend Jane Steen, who has written a great deal about ethical behavior for authors, has this to say about reciprocal reviews.  1. On their own, individual reviews don’t make a huge difference. Let’s be honest. While it helpful to have some reviews on…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Self Talk

    The Single Best Writing Advice (Too Bad I Don’t Always Follow It)

    We’ve heard it before, write what you know. Or, write every day. Or, READ! READ! READ! And while that is all very good advice, and you should follow it fervently, it’s still not the best.One of the best pieces of advice I was given in college was this: Never compare yourself to others.  If you do, you’ll compare their strengths to your weaknesses, and you’ll always be the loser. When I compare myself to other writers, it doesn’t do me a bit of good. I either pick up some frothy bonnet romance and throw it across the room, puffing myself up with thoughts of superiority. My books will have more meaning! I will be more…