• Self Talk,  Uncategorized

    Five Awful Things My Work-In-Progress Says To Me And What I Say Back

    I have a work-in-progress and I think it hates me. Every day I sit down with this project, set my timer, turn on the music, spend way too much time thinking about font, size, and color, and then work at least an hour. When I sit down with it, I feel it come alive. It is a non-fiction book, so it’s not like it’s alive in the sense of genre or character. It’s alive with the ease (or lack of ease) that comes with the drafting and sculpting of each chapter. At times, it feels like it’s fighting against me.  Some days, it is sterile and compliant; I’m the boss.…

  • Motivation

    10 Ways To Lift Yourself Out of That Writing Funk

        Being in a funk comes with the writing territory. Because writers are already of the sensitive, angsty type, we are the first to fall into a depressive funk. At best, these funks slow us down and sap our motivation. At their worst, the blues can paralyze your creativity completely. You could be so down you pick up self-destructive behaviors. (Don’t do that! Addiction is never flattering!) I know I’ve sat down with my word count and my work-in-progress looming wanted it to go away.    What should you do instead if you’re feeling a little down? Take a self care inventory. Are you getting enough sleep? Have you eaten…

  • Discipline,  Inspiration,  Motivation,  Self Talk

    10 Destructive, Cowardly Lies I Had To Discard So I Could Become A Writer

    This is one of my favorite blog posts. I’m bringing it back from 2014 because I think we could all use a fresh reminder!  We don’t get in this business to be comfortable. We get in this business because the drive to create is bigger than the drive to be accepted. It takes guts and courage to throw your words to the world. And if lies are keeping you back, then you need to put them in the toilet with the rest of the ca-ca in your life.  I’ve overcome a lot of lies to get where I am today. That alone makes me a success. Not sales, not followers…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Discipline,  Motivation

    Top Ten Things I Did Right Last Year That Made All The Difference

    Happy New Year!  I’m so glad we’re starting over with a fresh, shiny new year. 2016 has a lot of hope and promise. 2015 wasn’t too shabby for me personally, but I did suffer the fallout of some of the decisions that I made in 2014.  2014 was the first year that I stood up for myself, aggressively took responsibility for my own happiness and walked in complete confidence. Today’s blog post is a throwback-what I did that year that made all the difference. I’m still processing 2015’s victories. I’ll have a post about them soon enough. Hope you enjoy this one.   2011 was a sucky year for me…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Perils of a Mom Writer,  Uncategorized

    Top Ten Things To Do If You Feel Burned Out As A Writer

    My 2015 was full. I released three books. I spoke two times. I attended four live book selling events. I launched a podcast. I was featured on three other podcasts. I wrote more than 365,000 words (that averaged 1000 words a day).  I was successful in Nanowrimo, writing my 50,000 words. I launched my weekly encouraging newsletter. I also took on a part-time job as a homeschooling tutor. I did all this while maintaining my household, hosting two chats a week, homeschooling my five kids and baking my bread from scratch. This all looks very impressive until you pull the curtain back and see the truth: I was a nervous…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Self Talk

    Why I Stopped Journaling And How It’s Made Me Happier and Healthier

    Once, a long time ago, I thought that my journals had magical powers. Journals, were, since I had started writing in one at age 14, a place were all my feels (and believe me, I had a lot of feels) were safe. My journals were a place that I could take out my feels.  I could analyze them. I could ruminate on them. I took each thought as if it were a pebble from a pocket run my fingers across its jagged edges. With a journal you can go back and remember pain. I would analyze events and observations the way an astronomer analyzes the stars. I wanted clarity perhaps, or…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Beautiful Words,  Inspiration

    Who Are We? A Existential Rambling From A Novelist Who Should Probably Know Better

    Who are we? What is our identity? These are big questions that haven’t been fully answered by the wisest men. But I’d like to suggest that we are more than our genders, more than our hobbies, more than our avatars, more than our homes, more than our children, more than our possessions. I ask this because I have always struggled with identity. I spent a good part of my childhood fighting for attention, fighting for reassurance, fighting for comfort, for safety, for aspirations, for acceptance that exactly who I am is enough. That fight lasted way too long and the addition of titles like wife and mother just made fight…

  • #WhyIWrite,  Perils of a Mom Writer

    Why I Write: A Guest Post By Carolyn Astfalk

    I only recently pondered why I write. I simply knew that I had to write, so I did. My love affair with the written word started with clumsily-illustrated stories and spelling bees and grew to student newspapers in grade school, high school, and college. My affection for pen and ink led me to try my hand at calligraphy. During summer visits, I sat spellbound as my aunt, my mother’s only sister, analyzed my handwriting as well as written samples from my family members, friends, and teachers. My penchant for fiction grew out of Nancy Drew speed reading competitions with my best friend and blossomed into the memorization of S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders and my love for Margaret Mitchell’s…

  • #WhyIWrite

    Why I Write By Katharine Grubb, Founder 10 Minute Novelists

       You may have been like me. You may have always needed to write. You may have been like me and you had five children under eight years old and all you could think about is a story.  Or maybe you wondered why if you could tell a funny story about a bunny at bath time, why you couldn’t tell something more complicated and interesting for others? So in your desperation, you checked a book out of the library and you read it while you were nursing the baby.  Or when you sat at the playground or watched the children play in the back yard. You thought about writing even though…

  • Craft,  Inspiration

    #Top10Tuesday: Top Ten Exercises To Determine Your Raison D’Etre As A Writer by Katharine Grubb

    What Do I Write About? I firmly believe that the use of fancy French phrases (and also alliteration) makes one an excellent writer. Oh, I kid. But really, we should kinda know what we want when we set out to become a rich and famous writer. . But if you don’t know who you are, or what you want, or what you’re good at. It’s okay. You can find out with thinking and hard work.  So, I’d like to propose a few exercises to get you thinking about your purpose, or your raison d’etre. If you spend ten minutes a day thinking or writing on any of these, you might discover…

  • Beautiful Words,  Craft

    Five Lessons For Prose Writers From Poetry: A Guest Post by Elizabeth Buege

    I’m a wordaholic. I love to work with words in as many different ways as possible, so right now, I’m a writing teacher, a freelance editor, and a writer. For all that I’m hooked on words, though, I’m definitely not is a poet. I read poetry, but I can’t find the patience to write my own. Still, the poems I’ve read have taught me valuable things that I now apply to my prose (as well as that of my students and authors). The following rules come from poetry, but the principles are universal. Whatever you love to write, they still apply. Here are the top five writing lessons I’ve learned…

  • #Top10Tuesday,  Self Talk

    #Top10Tuesday Top Ten Things You Should Be Saying To Yourself That Will Help Make You More Successful

    In February, I posted, Top 10 Things You Could Be Saying To Yourself That Will Guarantee Your Failure As A Writer  Today I want to do the opposite! 1. Everybody Makes Mistakes.  This is huge! You need to be reminded that every successful writer has a team behind them of editors, agents and publishers that help them make their book the best it can be. Don’t freak out over the errors in your manuscript. Just fix them and move on! 2. Tomorrow Is Another Day. Plan on making every single day the best you can to pursue your goals, but be realistic. Some days, you’re not going to get your words in,…

  • #MondayBlogs,  Self Talk

    The Single Best Writing Advice (Too Bad I Don’t Always Follow It)

    We’ve heard it before, write what you know. Or, write every day. Or, READ! READ! READ! And while that is all very good advice, and you should follow it fervently, it’s still not the best.One of the best pieces of advice I was given in college was this: Never compare yourself to others.  If you do, you’ll compare their strengths to your weaknesses, and you’ll always be the loser. When I compare myself to other writers, it doesn’t do me a bit of good. I either pick up some frothy bonnet romance and throw it across the room, puffing myself up with thoughts of superiority. My books will have more meaning! I will be more…

  • #EthicalAuthor,  Author Profile,  Self Talk

    Love Your Reader, Love Your Art, Love Yourself a Guest Post by Jude Knight

    When this post goes live, Valentine’s Day will be right around the corner, which is good, because this post is about love. Not romantic love, of course. Did you know that the Feast of St Valentine originally commemorated two or three different saints, and was associated with the beginning of Spring? The connection between Valentine and romantic love is only a few hundred years old (700, to be exact). Before the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer made the link, the love that we celebrated on the Feast of St Valentine was not romantic love, but the love given by one who serves. As writers, we serve readers and, in a sense,…