• Community

    Plan Your Conferences The Right Way

    by Jane Steen It’s Conference Season! What now? Ever finished a conference season feeling you didn’t get much value for your money? Or are you still waiting to go to your first writers’ conference, paralyzed by the choices out there or worried about the cost? Here are some practical tips to help you approach next year’s conferences in great shape.   Decide on your needs It’s best to approach conference season in light of your unique needs. Do you need to soak up advice about the writing craft? Do you want to learn about self-publishing? Do you want to pitch a story to agents? Do you want to make connections within your…

  • Community,  Uncategorized

    Five Signs To Keep Writers From Going Wrong

    By TLC Nielsen Are you a Writer Gone Wrong? 10 minute novelists are an upbeat, happy group of writers striving to be all they can word-ly be. But unbeknownst to many is another, small group of writers who hoard their words, shudder from social interaction with other (competing) authors, and cannot restrain themselves from talking/chatting/emailing about their books, blogs and other writings far more than necessary. This group of writers took dangerous forks on the writerly road, ending up down a path they never intended to take. Here are 5 road signs to keep you, and me, from joining Writers Gone Wrong! Road Sign #1 Writing Conferences- To go or…

  • Craft,  Inspiration

    7 Ways To Keep Your Buzz & Write Drunk — By Elaine Bayless

      “Write drunk. Edit sober.” Easy enough, right? It means to write without boundaries, loose and wild and out of control. Thoughtful word selection and complex grammatical decisions belong in the world of editing. And yet, how often do you “lose your buzz” and start editing right in the middle of writing? How do you write drunk? During Nanowrimo each year I see dozens of people falling into the editing trap when they should be writing. I get it: I’ve been trapped by those some concerns too. But nothing kills the possibility of finishing your work faster than accidentally falling into editing mode. Here’s 7 ways to keep your buzz…

  • #WhyIWrite

    Why I Write — By Paula Kelly Ince (A Series By The Writers of 10 Minute Novelists)

    When I read this quote from Philip Pullman everything inside me shouted; yes! Fiction is my first love – I fell in love with fiction long before I fell in love with any boys or girls. I come from a large, chaotic family and whilst we all love one another, there is always some sort of drama going on, always has been. I was the eldest of five, on top of which my parents were emergency foster carers, so we regularly had neglected and abused children arriving on our doorstep at various times of the day and night and staying for anything between a few days and several months. Story…

  • Community

    Plan Next Year’s Conference(s) The Right Way — A Guest Post by Jane Steen

    Ever finished a conference season feeling you didn’t get much value for your money? Or are you still waiting to go to your first writers’ conference, paralyzed by the choices out there or worried about the cost? Here are some practical tips to help you approach next year’s conferences in great shape. Decide on your needs It’s best to approach conference season in light of your unique needs. Do you need to soak up advice about the writing craft? Do you want to learn about self-publishing? Do you want to pitch a story to agents? Do you want to make connections within your genre? Take a few minutes and write down your…

  • #IndependentPublishing,  Publishing,  Self-Publishing

    Learning From The Independent Publishing Experience: A Guest Post By Jude Knight

    What have you learned from this experience? The headline is a quote from the man I adore: “What have you learned from this experience?” (Not, incidentally, what you want to hear when you’ve just bumped your toe or broken your heart. But I love you, darling.) Six months ago last month, I published my first historical romance, a novella. I’ve since published a novel, am about to publish another one, and will have another novel and a novella out by my 1st anniversary as an independent publisher. I still have a great deal to learn, but here are my top five lessons from this first venture into the wild and…

  • #Top10Tuesday

    #Top10Tuesday Writing On The Go! A Guest Post by Jessica White

    As we head into summer, many of us are going to get outdoors more, take vacations, and spend more time away from our desks and thus our computers. But as writers this often proves problematic since we still have deadlines and our brains rarely shut off just because it isn’t convenient to write. But have no fear, here are ten ways you can keep writing even when you are away from home. 1. These days, almost everyone has a cellphone.  We keep them within hands reach almost every waking hour. When writing on the go they are a great tool.  Standing in line with three carts in front of you…

  • Discipline,  Revising and Editing

    Editing. Is It More Important Than The Writing? Hell, Yes! A Guest Post by Jennifer Senhaji

    Writers, like all artists, are a creative bunch. There are some that are meticulous about structure and form. There are some that fly by the seat of their pants on the winds of inspiration. Both make good writers. Editing, proper and professional editing, make great writers. You may be thinking you’ve heard this before. You know you have to edit. You know not to rush to publish. You’ve read enough poorly or unedited books by now to know the value of editing. But I’m here to tell you that’s just the tip of the publishing iceberg. You can have the most fantastic, most original, next Pulitzer Prize winning novel sitting…

  • Creativity

    Beginnings Are Not Just Background: Creating Good Characters A Guest Post By Sophia Ryan

      Character development should start from scene one of your novel and end when the novel does. But how do you write characters we all want to read about? Coloring your dialog with details such as gesture, appearance, tone, thoughts, and reaction helps readers get a better sense of your characters. And, if readers have a better sense of who your characters are, says author Nancy Kress in her book, Beginnings, Middles, and Ends, they might be more willing to read more of your story. There are times when you want quick, back-and-forth dialog with limited narrative, but that works best when the reader already knows your characters. In the…

  • #WhyIWrite

    Why I Write: A Series By Members of 10 Minute Novelists — By Tyler Omichimski

    I have a cheap and easy cop-out for this one: I write because I don’t know how not to. I started writing when I was five or something, writing terrible things that were filled with deus ex machina and what would have me castigated for flagrant copyright violations. Fortunately, none of that got published. I also read. Reading is like a religion to me. It’s a challenge. Friends and family have joked, in the past, that I don’t read so much as eat books. I read fast. That’s thanks to my dad reading the entirety of The Hobbit, and then the entirety of the Lord of the Rings trilogy to…

  • #MagicalMarketing,  Marketing,  Self-Publishing

    Help: I Have To Market My Book! : A Guest Post By Robin Patchen

    My third book released a couple of weeks ago, ushering me into the most dreaded activity of this writer’s life: marketing. I hate it, and for good reason. When somebody asks me what my book is about, I start talking like a Valley Girl who’s inhaled too much hairspray. “So like there’s this girl…like lady, right? And she’s like scared of this guy she knew from before…’cause see, when she was a teenager…” Shocking I don’t sell more copies by hand. I don’t do much better in print. But mostly, I hate marketing because I have to ask for help. Writers have to ask for endorsements, influencers, reviews, and shares.…

  • #MagicalMarketing,  Marketing

    Selling Books Through Non-Marketing: A Guest Post By Jude Knight

    How to non-market I’ve spent a large part of my career as a commercial writer in my own small business. Small business owners are responsible for everything. I was writer, peer reviewer, company book-keeper, chief executive, project manager, strategic planner, store manager, cleaner of toilets, sales person and, of course, the big ‘M’ word. The one I feared. Marketing. So I learnt how to promote my business by non-marketing: marketing that doesn’t feel like marketing. Marketing that an introvert like me could do just by being myself. It was good preparation for being a self-published writer. Again, I am running my own business. And again, I’m out in the world…

  • #MagicalMarketing,  Self-Publishing

    We’ve Been Here Before! Self-Publishing and Webcomics! A Guest Post By Tyler Omichinski

    I want you to take your mind back for a moment to the heady days of the early to mid, and heck even the later, aughts. It was before the recession that seems to go on forever, or is already done, depending who you talk to.  There was also a shift going on in the world of comics. During this time the people at Half Pixel (Scott Kurtz, Dave Kellet, Kristopher Straub, and Brad Guigar) were hosting a podcast where they talked about webcomics and this “fancy new thing” of publishing direct to the web. They talked about not being recognized at the major awards, publishers and others being unable…

  • Beautiful Words,  Craft

    Five Lessons For Prose Writers From Poetry: A Guest Post by Elizabeth Buege

    I’m a wordaholic. I love to work with words in as many different ways as possible, so right now, I’m a writing teacher, a freelance editor, and a writer. For all that I’m hooked on words, though, I’m definitely not is a poet. I read poetry, but I can’t find the patience to write my own. Still, the poems I’ve read have taught me valuable things that I now apply to my prose (as well as that of my students and authors). The following rules come from poetry, but the principles are universal. Whatever you love to write, they still apply. Here are the top five writing lessons I’ve learned…