Tag Archives: conferences

Free & Not-So-Free Writers’ Conferences For The Poor And Anthropophobic

 

It’s Conference Season!

Another spring has arrived and you will not be going to a writer’s conference. I’m so sorry. I’m not either.

I’ve been trying to get to the ACFW conference in September every fall for the last ten years and I’m not any closer now than I was ten years ago.  I did, however, get to go to the Mountain Valley Writers’ Conference in Lake Guntersville, Alabama a few weeks ago. And I have the bug to go, and speak, at another one. But it may not be for a while. I loved speaking to a group of writers. But then I had to talk to them and that was scary!

Because I can’t go to writers conferences, I can do one of two things. One…

The other option, and the one that is a lot more entertaining, IMHO, is to create my own conference!

You can do this too!

Free and Not So Free Writers Conferences for the Poor and Anthropophobic

If you do your own conferencing in the privacy of your own home, it’s free and there’s the added bonus of not actually having to talk to people.

For us financially strapped anthropophobes out there, this is a win-win.

I’ve created a list of some of the hundreds (if not thousands) of free resources for writers online.

This is NOT exhaustive. But it will certainly get you started if you can’t afford to go out to learn how to be a great writer. There are blogs, websites, videos, virtual conferences, podcasts and groups you can participate in. And DON’T forget your local library (although you should put clothes on to go there, and you may have to actually speak to someone!)

Need To Feel Like You Are Actually At A Conference?

Colgate Writer’s Conference on YouTube, Or The Thriller Online Writing Conference or the Science Fiction and Fantasy Conference.

Need To Listen To Celebrity Authors Talk About Writing?

 Anne Rice on YouTube, Susan Conley at TedTalks, Rick Riordan,  Need more? How about the 15 Best Youtube Channels for Writers?

Support 10 Minute Novelists

General Fiction Writing Tips and Strategies?

Start here: Inside Creative Writing, episode one from Florida State University, then, you can YouTube search: fiction writing. Or try Gotham Writers Workshop!  You will find DOZENS of videos to watch. Watch them all!

Need Ideas For Marketing?

 Eighty-nine book marketing ideas that will change your life. And Five Easy Ways To Publicize and Promote Your Book or, if you’re a member of the 10 Minute Novelists Facebook Group, you can read the feed of the chat we had a few weeks ago “Messy Mash-Up Marketing Marathon: My Notes From The MacGregor Literary Seminar”.  What? You’re NOT A MEMBER OF OUR FACEBOOK GROUP?  You can click here and join!

Getting restless? Wanna actually do some writing?

 Here’s a link to 10 Universities that offer free writing courses! FREE EDUCATION!  All you poor impoverished xenophobes out there don’t even have to get dressed!

Other things you can do!

Listen to podcasts. Here’s a link to the best podcasts on writing. 

Sign up for writers groups. Here are online writers groups that can help you!

Read everything about writing you can get your hands on at your library. Here’s a list of the best books on writing! 

Find a coach or mentor. This article tells you how to do that! 

Read agents’ blogs. Read editors’ blogs. Ask authors if you can interview them.

Don’t forget to write!

And Follow Our Pinterest Boards!

10 Minute Novelists have over fifty writing related boards on Pinterest that link you to hundreds of resources on craft, marketing, social media, writing prompts, structure, character, everything!

And if you are willing to attend a live one, make it this one. We’d love to have you!

Yes, I have to stand next to the financially strapped and anthropophobic writers this year, but that’s not an excuse for not learning all I can about how to write well. If I can do it, you can too! 

Top 10 Pro Tips For Attending A Writing Conference

by Christina Alexander

February is upon us and that means conference season approaches.

If you are attending your first writing conference, CONGRATULATIONS! You have made the first step to furthering your writing career. While each conference is unique in the opportunities it offers, there are some universal tips to remember in order to get the most out of the conference.

Top 10 Pro Tips For Attending A Writing Conference

1.    Choose Wisely

Conferences are expensive. Often, it’s an issue of saving up money all year before being able to afford to go. Between registration, cost of travel, hotel, food, and other goodies (not taking into account the prep beforehand), you can easily spend up to $2000 per conference. In this case, choosing the right conference is just as important as deciding to attend a conference. Is it hosted by a genre specific organization like the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, or is it a general conference for all authors like the Writer’s Digest Annual Conference? Each has its own benefits and drawbacks depending on what you are looking to accomplish, and what they provide.

Pro Tip: Last year when many of my writing friends were attending Romantic Times in Las Vegas, I was tempted to attend. But after some careful consideration I decided to attend the Romance Writers of America conference in San Diego, CA instead. While RT is fun, and many of my friends were attending, it offers more for published authors. I realized that at this point in my career I would benefit from the networking opportunities and workshops of RWA. I can always attend RT after my books come out. (Admin note: The first ever conference for 10 Minute Novelists will be held in 2018. Watch this spot for more details.)

2.    Plan Ahead

Once you decide on the conference that best suits your needs, plan ahead. Most conferences release workshop schedules to attendees a few weeks before the event. Sit down with the list of workshops (and their room numbers) and a map of the conference facility. Go through the list and see which workshops you want to attend and figure out where they are. Most workshops run 45-minutes, with a 15-minute break in between. You’ll have just enough time to get from one room to the other, and maybe stop by the bathroom on your way.

Pro Tip: I have a confession to make–I am addicted to spreadsheets. When I attended RWA last summer, I went prepared. I took a map of the conference hotel, a list of the workshops, and put them on a spreadsheet. That way I had a visual of what was happening where and at what time. I even color coded it based on the type of workshop it was (craft, chat, research, career, etc). It was a thing of beauty…

3.  Time Management

Hand-in-hand with knowing the schedule ahead of time, is knowing what the best use of your time is. With many workshops occurring at the same time, it’s sometimes difficult to decide which to attend. If you face this dilemma, sit towards the rear of the room. There is no shame in ducking out of one workshop to attend another. It’s common to see people coming and going to listen to different speakers.

Pro Tip: When I found out that some of the workshops I wanted to attend were occurring simultaneous of each other, I panicked. Then I regrouped and took note of which ones were recorded. RWA records many of its workshops and offers them for sale to members. That way I was able to attend the unrecorded workshops and purchase the recordings for my library. Check with your conference, sometimes they’ll offer them for purchase ahead of time at a discount.

4.    The Hunt For Representation

Are your conference offers pitch sessions, and you are seeking representation, it is important to research the industry professionals who will be taking pitches. If you attend a general conference like Writer’s Digest or the Southern California Writer’s Conference, be sure the agent you pitch to represents what you write. It will be a waste of time for both of you if you pitch your literary fiction novel to and agents who only reps children’s books. Even if you are attending a genre specific conference, not all agents or publishers represent the same books. A publisher who produces romance books for the LGBTQ community will not be interested in a small town contemporary romance with straight characters.

Pro Tip: I know it’s tempting to bring your completed manuscript with you to a conference, but I don’t recommend doing so. Most industry professionals will not have time to read with an eye for acquiring, and they do not have the room to pack multiple manuscripts. If you get a request for your manuscript, you will be given specific instructions on how to submit the required documents.

5. Pitch Perfect

You did your research and made a pitch appointment with your dream agent. Do you have your pitch ready? If you don’t, now is the time to write one. If you are having trouble with it, think of your pitch as the back cover copy on your book. What would it read like when your book is published?

Most pitch appointments run anywhere from five to ten minutes. You’ll have a few minutes to give your pitch and some time afterwards to chat with your prospective editor or agent. While you can memorize your pitch, it is always a good idea to keep some notes handy in case your mind goes blank. Don’t worry if your delivery isn’t perfect, industry professionals know most writers are introverts and public speaking–especially in front of strangers–isn’t their thing.

Pro Tip: When I pitched my story I made sure to write it on a 3×5 note card. It kept me on point, and also gave me a place to write questions of my own. The pitch itself only took two minutes, and that left time for the agents to ask me questions about my story and where I see my career going (hint: they’re looking for longevity!), and for me to ask questions about the agent, their agency and how they could help me achieve my goals.

6.    Be Prepared

I can’t stress enough how important it is to be prepared. Not only for your pitch, but also for your workshops. I’ve known some people who get so focused on their pitch appointment, they forget about the workshops and networking opportunities available to them. Make a list of things you will need to bring with you. If you like to handwrite notes, be sure to bring a notebook and pens with you. If you are more technically inclined, a tablet, laptop or mobile phone may be more your style–just be sure to bring a portable charger or two to make sure you are fully charged at all times.

Pro Tip: Many conferences are held at hotels, but the little hotel notepads don’t offer much space for note taking. I always bring extra notepads and pens in case someone needs one. If you’re published, you can even bring a pen with your website or logo on it. What better way to be remembered than as “that nice writer who gave me a pen when I needed one.” Who knows, you may meet a new friend or writing partner this way.

7.    Networking

Opportunities abound to network with other authors, editors, agents and other industry professionals. Aside from the pitch appointments and workshops, there are evening socials, publisher parties, and the ubiquitous hotel bar. I know, writers tend to be a solitary lot but a conference is the perfect time to break out of your shell and make connections. Here are a few things you should have in your networking arsenal.

  • Business Cards: If you haven’t done so yet, now is the time to have some business cards made. They should include:
    • Your name
    • Your email and/or phone number
    • Your social media handles
    • Your website, if you have one
    • What you write
    • Optional items include:
      • Your tag line, if you have one
      • A photo headshot
  • Elevator Pitch: You may run into editors and agents in unexpected places and should be ready with your elevator pitch. The premise is that it should only take as long as an elevator ride.
    • Having trouble thinking one up? An easy way to create an elevator pitch is to summarize your story into one sentence of 20 words or less. Similar to how the old TV Guide movie entries used to read.
  • Elevator Introduction: You should be able to introduce yourself at a conference. Confession–I get super nervous around big name authors and editors, so I fan girl. A lot. Which usually means I forget my own name. In order to combat this and at least look like I know what I’m doing, I have a little introduction that I keep handy.
    • “Hi, my name is Christina. I’m a 911 dispatcher by day, historical romance author by night.”
      • It’s fun, it’s quick, and a shows a bit of personality. It’s also a nice ice-breaker to use at the bar and social events.

Pro Tip: I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but I’m going to say it again. The bathroom is not the place to pitch your book. You can wait a few minutes for your target industry professional to exit the bathroom before you launch into your pitch.

8.    Pack and Dress Wisely

Don’t know what to wear? You can’t go wrong with business casual. While most conferences don’t have a dress code, you will want to present yourself as a professional. Shorts, jeans, t-shirts, and flip-flops may be appropriate for your hotel room or walking about town, but not necessarily for you pitch session or workshops.

I mentioned before that many conferences are held at hotels, and hotels are notoriously cold in their public rooms. Be sure to bring a sweater and to dress in layers.

Pro Tip: Packing also goes hand-in-hand with being prepared. Make sure to check, and recheck, what you have in your suitcase before you leave. Do not be like me and get to your conference destination only to realize until the first morning of the conference that you forgot to pack appropriate shoes. Luckily, there was a shopping center across the street from the hotel where I was able to buy an emergency pair before things got underway.

9.    Take Care of Yourself

Conferences are busy events. Lasting three to four days, they pack as much activity as they can into such a short amount of time. Workshops start early in the morning and go all day. Then there are the after parties, the publisher parties, the meet and greets, the hotel bar, books signings… the list goes on. It can be an introvert’s worst nightmare, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get the most out of it without having a nervous breakdown.

Pro Tips:

  • Be sure to wake up early enough to eat some breakfast, grab a cup of coffee (or two), and mentally prepare for the day.
  • Bring non-perishable snacks with you. Granola or protein bars are small enough to stick in a bag, and can stave off hunger until the next scheduled meal break.
  • Be sure to stay hydrated. Being inside with air conditioning can dehydrate you, even though you’re inside. Water bottles are easy to carry and refill as needed.
  • Try to avoid snacks and drinks that are heavy on the sodium and sugar, as they can dehydrate you.
  • Sitting for long periods of time taking notes can make everything tense up. Take some deep breaths and stretch your back and limbs, and flex your wrists.
  • Stay healthy! Wash your hands frequently, or use hand sanitiser. To prevent your skin from drying out too much, keep a travel size hand lotion in your bag.
  • Don’t forget your mouth! Stick lip balm is easily portable and will keep your lips from chapping in the air conditioned rooms, and a tin of mints will keep you fresh for your networking opportunities.
  • If you find yourself overwhelmed by the crowds and activity, take some time for yourself. If it’s close you can go to your room or, if your conference offers it, take advantage of the Quiet Room for a few minutes and recharge.

10. Have Fun

This is the most important tip I can give you: have fun.

Yes, writing is a business and a conference can go a long way to furthering your career. But this is also a time to listen, learn, laugh at the jokes, and make new friends.

When I attended my first writing conference, I didn’t know anybody or the first thing about writing a book. I went with an open mind and an empty notebook. I thought I would learn some new skills and, perhaps, come out with a story idea I could play with. Was I nervous? Absolutely! There’s nothing like being a new person in a new place completely unsure of yourself. I did not expect to walk out of there with new friends, friends who have turned into colleagues and have helped me grow as a writer over the years. You may go in as a solo writer, but you leave as a member of the community with everyone encouraging you on your way.

And that is truly priceless.


Christina Alexandra is a romance writer from Southern California. Always looking for an adventure, she has held many different jobs including both medical and veterinary offices, music teacher, law enforcement instructor, service dog puppy raiser, emergency grief counselor, coroner’s assistant and, currently, an emergency services operator. Christina writes stories set in Georgian and Regency England and credits her varied experiences as the foundation from which she builds true-to-life characters and emotional stories with a unique twist on modern issues. When not researching, writing or working, she spends her time traveling and cooking–oftentimes with a historical flare.

You can connect with Christina online at her website ~ facebook ~ twitter ~ instagram ~ g+

Top 10 Writers Conference Substitutes For The Poor & Xenophobic

If you’re a writer of any artistic credibility at all, then you have no money and you’re kind of afraid of people.

But don’t let either of those things stop you from becoming the best writer you can be.

The internet is full of free (and many not-so-free) writers resources that can help you become really awesome. Most of them have  the added bonus of not actually having to create small talk, bathe or find clothing that isn’t a moth-eaten sweater. For us financially strapped xenophobes out there, this is a win-win.

Top 10 Writers Conference Substitutes For The Poor and Xenophobic by Katharine Grubb 10 Minute Novelist

1. The Actual Conference 

A conference is an event, usually at a hotel, where a bunch of strangers meet in stuffy or inexplicably cold rooms, listen to a monotonous, overrated speaker read Power Point slides verbatim while the attendees struggle to stay awake. Are you sure you don’t want to scrape up enough money to go? How about these options instead? If you want to feel at home, mess with your home’s thermostat to make it as uncomfortable as possible.

What’s free:  The Muse Online Writer’s Conference  or the San Francisco Writers Conference

What’s not so free: The Backspace Writers Conference

2. Celebrity Authors Who Talk About Writing

Sometimes conferences have big name writers come and talk about their experiences. And then at the back table, when you’re standing in line to get their book signed, you get all tongue tied and forget how to spell your name for the inscription. Never fear, you can see these writers online and you lower the risk of fangirling significantly.

What’s free:  Anne Rice on YouTube, Susan Conley at TedTalks, Rick Riordan,  And all of these Ted Talk videos that are really cool. Need more? Do a search on YouTube for “Authors Talk About Writing” and you will be amazed at what you find.

What’s not so free: James Patterson Teaches Writing

3. General Fiction Writing Tips and Strategies

At a writer’s conference, often they have instructive sessions that go over the ins and outs of writing. If you’re lucky, they aren’t immediately after lunch, because then you’re fighting to stay awake. How about this? Go to these links for similar instruction and if you get sleepy, just put your head down on your desk. No one will know!

What’s free: Start here: Inside Creative Writing, episode one from Florida State University, Then, you can YouTube search: fiction writing.  You will find DOZENS of videos to watch. Watch them all!

What’s not so free: Gotham Writers Online Writing Classes

4. Ideas For Marketing

Sometimes at conferences, they have marketing experts come in and help authors with their platform and sales ideas. Who doesn’t want to sell more books? The more books we sell, the more conferences we can go to! Try these if you’re not going to conferences this year.

What’s Free:  Eighty-nine book marketing ideas that will change your life. And Five Easy Ways To Publicize and Promote Your Book or, my friend Rachel Thompson has created a list of sources for you! 

What’s Not So Free: This list from Publishing Review will give you some links to book promoting sites that can help you out. 

5. Writing Courses

So if you went to a conference, your speaker would cram a lot of information in a 55 minute session.  If you want something a little more thorough, you could take a course instead! And these courses don’t require you to get dressed or shake the cat hair off that holey sweater.

What’s Free:  Here’s a link to 10 Universities that offer free writing courses! FREE EDUCATION!  All you poor impoverished xenophobes out there don’t even have to get dressed!

What’s Not So Free:  Writer’s Digest has a lot of courses! These look really good!

6. Podcasts

It’s time to rest your eyes and use your ears! If you leave your earbuds in, all the time, no one will talk to you. Make the most of this alone time by listening to these writing podcasts. The Write Life has found the 10 Best for you! 

7.  Resources on Twitter

It’s all free! Here are 52 tweetchats and hashtags that can help you in your writing pursuits. And my favorite is the #10MinNovelists chat every Thursday at 9PM EDT. This is the great thing about Twitter. You can follow along and you don’t have to talk to anyone! (That is, unless you’re the host. Like me. Yikes.)

8. Agents’ blogs

Because you are true xenophobe, you can glean all the wisdom of some great agents through their blogs. Rachelle Gardner’s is a great place to hang out. Janet Reid has a lot of good stuff to say. Laura Crockett’s blog is not just informative, but it’s also so pretty! And Chip MacGregor is the only literary agent in this list that has bought me nachos. This is his blog.  Most of them don’t accept unsolicited manuscripts, so if you want to get their attention for your work, read their submissions guidelines carefully.

9. Editors’ blogs

And maybe the reason that you are xenophobic is because you’ve been stabbed with a red pen too many times. Never fear. These editors can’t reach you through your computer screen. But they do have a lot to say about writing and what not to do. This is Evil Editor, Query Shark, and Subversive Copy Editor. You know, they do seem a teensy bit scary. If they’re too much for you, go over to Robin Patchen’s Red Pen Editing Services and ask for a virtual hug, she’ll be happy to oblige.

10. Wrapping it all up on Pinterest

10 Minute Novelists have over fifty writing related boards on Pinterest that link you to hundreds of resources on craft, marketing, social media, writing prompts, structure, character, everything! And no one will bother you there. They’re free and when you’re done clicking all the pins, you’ll know everything and that’s our point here, isn’t it?

This list is NOT exhaustive. But it will certainly get you started if you can’t afford to go out to learn how to be a great writer. And DON’T forget your local library (although you should put clothes on to go there, and you may have to actually speak to someone. You can do it, though, most librarians don’t bite and if they do, they probably have all their shots.)

I have to stand next to the financially strapped and xenophobic writers this year, but that’s not an excuse for not learning all I can about how to write well. If I can do it, you can too! 

 

 

Do you have any other suggestions? What worked for you? What didn’t work? Are you poor or xenophobic or both? 

Plan Next Year’s Conference(s) The Right Way — A Guest Post by Jane Steen

Ever finished a conference season feeling you didn’t get much value for your money? Or are you still waiting to go to your first writers’ conference, paralyzed by the choices out there or worried about the cost? Here are some practical tips to help you approach next year’s conferences in great shape.

-- A GUEST POST BY JANE STEEN

Decide on your needs

It’s best to approach conference season in light of your unique needs. Do you need to soak up advice about the writing craft? Do you want to learn about self-publishing? Do you want to pitch a story to agents? Do you want to make connections within your genre? Take a few minutes and write down your goals for next year. Then write down the one thing you’d like to achieve to make that year shine for you.

Make a shortlist

Don’t just focus on that conference your friend always goes to and which sounds cool. Search on “writers conference” and research what’s out there, then make a shortlist of conferences that might fit your needs and research some more. Make a spreadsheet to record the vital stats of each conference on your list—where it’s to be held, how much it costs, and what kind of sessions, workshops, classes or opportunities it offered this year (because next year’s offerings won’t be publicized until quite near the conference date).

Plan your time

When making your shortlist, note the dates of those conferences and compare them with your work and home calendars. Think about graduations, house moves, milestone events for family members, and work commitments for you and anyone else who’s going to be needed at home while you’re away. You might even need to plan around medical needs—if you know you’re heading for a knee replacement, get it done well before the conference.

Calculate the cost

There’s nothing worse than drawing near to the date of a conference and then realizing it’s going to make a much bigger hole in your bank account than you’d thought. Especially since conference fees are often non-refundable past a certain date, as the conference organizers have to make financial commitments based on the fees they’ve received. So be smart—once you’ve figured out one to three hot contenders for your time and money, calculate just how much money that’s going to be. You’ll be paying for the conference fee, a hotel stay, possibly meals (check this), travel to and from the conference, a new outfit or two and about $200 in incidental expenses. Think of the conference as a working vacation in an expensive resort, and you’ll get the picture.

If you’re not going to be able to afford the total cost of the conference, don’t sign up. Don’t just assume the money will be there when you need it. Strategize alternatives—could you forgo a vacation to pay for the conference (negotiate this with your spouse if you have one)? Could you go to the cheaper local conference instead? Could you stay with a friend instead of at the hotel, or share a hotel room? Does the conference award scholarships, and how do you apply?

Be careful if you’re asked to be on a panel or help present a workshop at a conference, as many conferences expect presenters to work for nothing or next to nothing, to pay for their hotel room and travel, etc. If finances are an issue, make sure you know what the deal is before you say yes. Dropping out later because you’ve realized you can’t afford the trip will be awkward all round.

Register early

If you’ve ascertained you can afford your target conference, sign up as early as you can. The early bird usually gets lower fees, the most favorable hotel rate, and guaranteed participation in events that fill up fast. Make a note of the date past which there’s no refund for cancellations, and set a reminder to review your schedule before the no-refund date to make sure nothing new has cropped up at work or at home.

Want to pitch? Research your agents

If you’re signing up for a conference because you have a manuscript to pitch to an agent or publisher, or think you’ll have one ready by the conference date, research those industry professionals meticulously before you sign up. You might only get one or two pitch sessions, so make sure you’re pitching to the very best fit you can find. And if you draw near the conference date and realize your manuscript won’t be ready after all, contact the organizers and release your spots to someone else. Don’t pitch an incomplete manuscript.

If you find these suggestions helpful, let us know in the comments. I have a few more for you—and perhaps Katharine will let me come back again!


Historical Romance Author Jane Steen

Jane Steen was born in England and, despite having spent more years out of the British Isles than in, still has a British accent according to just about every American she meets.
Around the edges of her professional occupations and raising children, she stuck her nose in a book at every available opportunity and at one time seemed on course to become the proverbial eternal student. Common sense prevailed, though, and eventually she had the bright idea of putting her passion for books together with her love of business and writing to become a self-published author.
Jane has lived in three countries and is currently to be found in the Chicago suburbs with her long-suffering husband and two adult daughters. Her book, House of Closed Doors can be found here. 

Do-It-Yourself Writers’ Conferences For The Poor And Xenophobic

It happened again.

Another fall has arrived and you will not be going to a writer’s conference.

 I’ve been trying to get to the ACFW conference in September every fall for the last five years and I’m not any closer now than I was five years ago.  I did, however, get to go to the marketing seminar hosted by my agent’s firm. While it was cozy and fun and certainly educational, it’s not a BIG CONFERENCE like ACFW or RWA.

Because I can’t go, I can do one of two things. One option is to mope around and feel sorry for myself and decide that watching the new fall television lineup is more important than pursuing my dreams. The other option, and the one that is a lot more entertaining, IMHO, is to create my own conference! You can do this too!

If you do your own conferencing in the privacy of your own home, it’s free and there’s the added bonus of not actually having to talk to people. For us financially strapped xenophobes out there, this is a win-win.

Where can I find cheap writers conferences?

I’ve created a list of some of the hundreds (if not thousands) of free resources for writers online.

This is NOT exhaustive. But it will certainly get you started if you can’t afford to go out to learn how to be a great writer. There are blogs, websites, videos, virtual conferences, podcasts and groups you can participate in. And DON’T forget your local library (although you should put clothes on to go there, and you may have to actually speak to someone there.)

Here you go!

Need To Feel Like You Are Actually At A Conference?

Colgate Writer’s Conference on YouTube, Or The Muse Online Writer’s Conference  or the WriteOnCon for kidlit writers,

Need To Listen To Celebrity Authors Talk About Writing?

 Anne Rice on YouTube, Susan Conley at TedTalks, Rick Riordan,  Need more? Do a search on YouTube for “Authors Talk About Writing” and you will be amazed at what you find.

General Fiction Writing Tips and Strategies?

Start here: Inside Creative Writing, episode one from Florida State University, Then, you can YouTube search: fiction writing.  You will find DOZENS of videos to watch. Watch them all!

Need Ideas For Marketing?

 Eighty-nine book marketing ideas that will change your life. And Five Easy Ways To Publicize and Promote Your Book or, if you’re a member of the 10 Minute Novelists Facebook Group, you can read the feed of the chat we had a few weeks ago “Messy Mash-Up Marketing Marathon: My Notes From The MacGregor Literary Seminar”.  What? You’re NOT A MEMBER OF OUR FACEBOOK GROUP?  You can click here and join!

Getting restless? Wanna actually do some writing?

 Here’s a link to 10 Universities that offer free writing courses! FREE EDUCATION!  All you poor impoverished xenophobes out there don’t even have to get dressed!

Other things you can do!

Listen to podcasts

Sign up for writers groups.

Read everything about writing you can get your hands on at your library.

Find a coach or mentor.

Find online resources that are often free.

Read agents’ blogs.

Read editors’ blogs.

Ask authors if you can interview them.

Write!

And Follow Our Pinterest Boards!

10 Minute Novelists have over fifty writing related boards on Pinterest that link you to hundreds of resources on craft, marketing, social media, writing prompts, structure, character, everything!

Yes, I have to stand next to the financially strapped and xenophobic writers this year, but that’s not an excuse for not learning all I can about how to write well. If I can do it, you can too! 

What if I can't go to a conference?

Do you have any other suggestions? What worked for you? What didn’t work? Are you poor or xenophobic or both?