• Character Development,  Creativity,  Uncategorized

    Shipping: 14 Ways To Develop Romance In Your Story

    Man, do I love a good, believable romance. I like the slow kind, where looks are exchanged, where she ignores him, where he adores her, where their journey leads to something beautiful and long-lasting. I like the kinds of romance where the undercover action is a result of commitment, not the possibility of it. Good romance stories, in my opinion, have the reader fully engaged in the feelings of the couple long before they figure it out themselves. I didn’t know there was a term for this. Oh, this is why I write fiction! I can get emotionally involved in the romance of characters without actually getting emotionally involved! And…

  • Character Development

    13 More Mistakes You Could Make When Creating Narrative Voice

      Who is telling your story anyway? What is the point of view? You’ve had a story in your mind for weeks. Maybe you’ve twisted it, pounded it and cut it to pieces. You’ve already made many decisions on how it is to be told. But, have you put thought into the narrative voice? The narrative voice is the voice of the point of view character that tells the story. With a well-drawn point of view character, a story can be rich and interesting. You want to take the time to get this right. Last week, I blogged about 12 big mistakes that you can make in creating a narrative…

  • Character Development

    The 9 Things Your Main Character Needs From You

    Character development is one of my favorite things to do when I’m cooking up a new story. With the development of character, it’s like I’m meeting a new friend who trusts me enough to send me on an adventure. I need my character badly for, without him or her, I don’t have a voice for my story. But my character needs me too. I have the necessities to make them come alive. These are the nine things my main character needs from me. A name. This is obvious, and you can spend a lot of time looking at name meanings and overthink it to the point of ridicule, or you…

  • Character Development,  Uncategorized

    12 Mistakes You Could Make When Creating Narrative Voice

      Narrative voice is the voice of the narrator in a story. Every novel, especially those written in the first person, tells the story from a specific point of view.  If you’ve chosen a point of view for your story that is specific, you may find that it is complicated and difficult to keep the story only to their viewpoint. If done well, your narrative voice draws the reader into the story. The details of the thoughts and dialogue work together to make the narrator a sympathetic or likable character. But if the narrative voice is put together thoughtlessly, your reader may bore quickly, dismiss the narrator and possibly discard your…

  • Character Development

    Fall In Love With Your Characters So Your Readers Will Too

    By Jessica White One of my favorite parts of writing is creating characters. As a reader nothing makes me fall into a story faster than falling in love with a character.  It’s like meeting a new neighbor or making a new friend.  Even the antagonists are interesting to meet from the safety of my mind.   I love watching them grow in depth and complexity, learning their quirks, hobbies, backstories, and what makes them tick.  You can tell the exact same plot line from a million points of view, and each time it will be a different story, because each character will make different decisions. For many writers, a character…

  • Character Development

    Five Character Types That Make Great Antagonistic Forces

    The protagonist pushes forward, but the antagonistic force pushes back. An antagonistic force is a person in your story who is opposing your protagonist, either in small, accidental ways or in big obvious ones. Because of the contrast and the potential for great conflict, you want to develop your antagonist as richly as you do your main character. These four destructive character types could make your antagonist richer and even more realistic.     Little Miss Victim: Their life is so, so hard. This person has mastered the art of getting others to do their work for them. They may not even realize that they are their own worst enemy. In…

  • Character Development

    16 Questions About Body Language & Appearance For Your Character

      You’re an author, so your job is to fully communicate what your main character are thinking, doing, or even hiding. Often you can do this in the way that you describe their body language. In your first scene, your main character, Roy, might have just gotten his car stolen from someone he trusted. He’s going to show this in the way he stands and holds his duffle bag of clothes. Later, when he’s flirting with a cute girl in the Wal-Mart parking lot, he stands a different way entirely. He may offer her a piece of chewing gum in such a way that it feels more like a proposition.…

  • Character Development

    7 Defense Mechanisms You Could Give To Your Character

    You’ve picked out your character’s eye color, hair color, and favorite ice cream. You have even chosen their personality type, their deep dark secret, and deepest fear. You certainly haven’t ignored their greatest desire and figured out how their objective in the story works with, or against, this desire. So have you thought about adding a few defense mechanisms? A defense mechanism is a way that we handle stress. Defense mechanisms are often involuntary and can be seen as a form of self-deception. Your main character needs one or two because he shouldn’t be perfect. They should have a reason that they react to certain situations certain ways. They also…

  • Beautiful Words,  Character Development,  Craft

    Eight Ways You May Be Bungling Your Dialogue In Your Novel

      “I’m not bungling my dialogue,” you say to yourself. But you’ve had a few complaints from your beta readers about how they don’t like the characters. You’ve been told the story feels dead. While your plot is tight and your pacing is perfect, the characters themselves feel off. The trouble could be your dialogue. Dialogue is the soul of the characters. Dialogue is what brings the story to life for your reader. Are you bungling it? You may be bungling you dialogue if . . .  You’ve forgotten about the influence of setting. Your story’s setting may play a role in the way that your characters speak. But too…

  • Character Development,  Craft,  Uncategorized

    Eighteen Ways To Write An Emotionally Abusive Villain

        Let’s say you want to write a villain who doesn’t wear black, doesn’t have a weapon and doesn’t do all the things that typical baddies do.You want an emotionally abusive villain. Emotionally abusive villains are scarier than the Darth Vader types, in my humble opinion. They can play with a person’s mind, trick them into thinking that they are safe, twist their reality and torture their soul. In real life and in real literature  emotionally abusive villains have been responsible for all kinds of evil. Often emotional abusers are subtle. They don’t go for the obvious name calling. Instead they want to be see as following the letter…

  • Character Development,  Craft,  Inspiration,  Uncategorized

    5 Super Powers & 5 Sources of Kryptonite for Abused Characters

      Super powers always come from somewhere. Does your main character have super powers? If your main character has a history of abuse then you may have a super hero on your hands. This isn’t just the stuff of Marvel Comics. In real life, victims of abuse — at least those that have sought therapy, identified all facets of their past, and dealt with their pain — often display super powers that ordinary mortals don’t. These superpowers came from years of practice. They’re survival skills turned up to eleven. If you have a character whose past is particularly tragic, consider using some of these characteristics to portray them. Keep in…